What are the  Key Essentials?

The following are some key essentials of the information for our Troop. All of these matters are discussed in more detail in the Troop Handbook. Hopefully this information will help prepare you for a successful start to Scouting with our Troop!

Boy Scouts is different from Cub Scouts

You may have noticed some big changes between your Pack and our Troop. In Cub Scouts, adult leaders plan and lead Pack activities and advancement. In Boy Scouts, the Troop is Scout-led, with the Senior Patrol Leader (SPL) serving a role similar to the Cubmaster. Scouts are allowed to make decisions, succeed, fail and learn by running their own troop. Failure is sometimes the best teacher and success is a reward for both the Scouts and the adults who guide them. New parents should not be offended if the Scoutmaster asks them not to help in certain situations, and should not worry when adult leaders appear to let Scouts make a bad decision. Adult leaders are there to guide and maintain safety; and we will never allow a Scout to make a mistake that will seriously compromise their safety or the safety of another.

Weekly Meetings

Our Troop meets on Mondays during the school year from 7 to 8 pm at Leawood United Methodist Church at 2916 West 95th Street (LUMC). The entrance for troop functions is on the SE corner of the building. (The Troop takes a break during some holidays and spring break.) 

Scouts are expected to arrive on time, in uniform and with their Scout Handbooks. Being on time teaches proper respect and etiquette and is important for a successful meeting. We are expected to conduct ourselves as guests of LUMC and to leave it in the same condition as it was when we arrived. Adults may attend the meetings, but are asked to respect the meeting decorum and keep quiet if within ear shod. (Often adults gather in an adjacent classroom.)

Troop meetings are planned and run by the Senior Patrol Leader (SPL), who is assisted by his Assistant Senior Patrol Leaders (ASPLs) and the Patrol Leaders Council (PLC). At troop meetings Scouts will:

  • Gather for the opening ceremony, hear announcements of upcoming events and meet as a troop or patrol to make plans for upcoming activities and campouts. Often there is also a special program or a guest speaker.
  • Work (either as a group or individually) on rank and merit badge advancement with older Scouts or merit badge counselors.
  • Gather for the closing ceremony and the Scoutmaster’s Minute.

It is our hope that our troop meetings are fun and productive. Some of this is dependent on the scout-led nature of the meetings as well as the Scouts’ level of participation and behavior.

Schedule Conflicts

From time to time schedule conflicts will arise. Our Troop holds schoolwork, religious education and family responsibilities as a higher priority than Scouting. We also understand Scouts balance sports, band and other extracurricular activities. Be assured that there is no penalty for an absence from any meeting. If a Scout is unable to attend a troop meeting or activity due to a conflict, it is preferred that the Scout call, email or text his patrol leader to let him know. This is a responsibility of the Scout and not his parent. (Note: Good attendance is important for a Scout’s fulfillment of leadership for rank advancement. Significant absences will not count towards fulfilling advancement leadership requirements.)

First Year Scout Program

Troop 282 has a robust program specifically designed for our “First Year” scouts called Trail to First Class. This program is designed so our young Scouts will have the opportunity over the course of 12-18 months to advance through the initial ranks focused on skill achievements.

Camping

Our Troop loves to camp. We camp once a month during the school year rain or shine. Some campouts are one night but often we camp two nights. The PLC chooses the campouts at the start of each semester, and planning is done at regular troop meeting. Campouts are posted on Troop Track (our website) and announced at the weekly meetings. Sign-ups are done on Troop Track. Most campouts are less an hour drive of Kansas City, which helps facilitates Scouts who need to come and go for sports or other obligations. (See Camping section for more information.)

Parent Involvement

We are always in need of adult involvement and we cannot function without it. There are roles in every phase of a successful Scouting program that need adult involvement -- from attending camping and outdoor activities, to participation on committees, to “one-timers” like helping with driving or a special event. We expect parents to become involved with the Troop in some fashion; and we have jobs big and small. We also find Scouts tend to stay more active in Scouting when their parents are involved. The best way to get involved is to listen for or ask for an opportunity to help. Training is available online at my.scouting.org in order to give parents (or even grandparents) the tools they need. All active adult must complete the BSA Youth Protection Training to keep our Scouts safe.

Troop Communications

Our Troop utilizes several methods of communication of troop programs and activities. As part of the registration process, parents receive access to the secure portion of the Troop’s website on Troop Track which maintains a calendar of events and is full of other important information. The Troop also uses Troop Track to send emails about troop programs and activities. It is requested (but not required) that Scouts have their own email so they can also utilize Troop Track and receive troop emails. Finally, our PLC utilizes the GroupMe App to send group texts to each other to assist with their program planning. (Monitored by adult leaders.)

Uniforms

Scouts wear their Class A uniform for all weekly troop meetings, traveling to/from campouts, courts of honor, boards of review and other formal Scouting activities. For the Class A uniform, Scouts purchase a “Class A” shirt and the Troop provides a neckerchief. (Official Scout socks and belt are recommended.) Class B uniforms - consisting of red Troop T-shirts (provided by the Troop) - are worn while camping, for service projects and at summer camp.

Boy Scout Handbook

The Boy Scout Handbook is is vital to Scout participation and advancement. All Scouts should obtain a handbook as soon as possible because the handbook tracks and guides them through their Rank requirements and logs their camping and service project hours. You can purchase either a spiral bound version or a basic glued spine version. We highly recommend you purchase a cover for your handbook, which will help the handbook withstand the heavy wear and tear Scouts put them through as well as give them a place to keep a pen.

Basic Costs

Troop Dues are paid once a year at the start of 1st semester. (Currently $35.)  BSA Dues are paid at the start of 2nd semester.  (Currently $33.)  Campout costs vary depending on the activity and location. Typical costs ranges from $15 to $30, but some special campouts may be slightly more. Scholarships are available for financial hardships, as we want everyone to be able to participate. If you have specific questions about troop costs or scholarships, please contact either the Treasurer or Committee Chair.

How to Join

Any boy who meets the membership requirements  specified in the Boy Scout Handbook can join Troop 282. In general, this means the boy is between the age of 11 and 17 and/or has completed the 5th grade. (See Boy Scout Handbook for complete requirements.) Troop registration requires completion of the standard BSA registration form and payment of all fees. The annual registration fee is paid to the BSA National Council. It is requested that at least one parent register with their Scout as an Adult Leader.  (See Parent Involvement.)



What are the  Key Essentials?

The following are some key essentials of the information for our Troop. All of these matters are discussed in more detail in the Troop Handbook. Hopefully this information will help prepare you for a successful start to Scouting with our Troop!

Boy Scouts is different from Cub Scouts

You may have noticed some big changes between your Pack and our Troop. In Cub Scouts, adult leaders plan and lead Pack activities and advancement. In Boy Scouts, the Troop is Scout-led, with the Senior Patrol Leader (SPL) serving a role similar to the Cubmaster. Scouts are allowed to make decisions, succeed, fail and learn by running their own troop. Failure is sometimes the best teacher and success is a reward for both the Scouts and the adults who guide them. New parents should not be offended if the Scoutmaster asks them not to help in certain situations, and should not worry when adult leaders appear to let Scouts make a bad decision. Adult leaders are there to guide and maintain safety; and we will never allow a Scout to make a mistake that will seriously compromise their safety or the safety of another.

Weekly Meetings

Our Troop meets on Mondays during the school year from 7 to 8 pm at Leawood United Methodist Church at 2916 West 95th Street (LUMC). The entrance for troop functions is on the SE corner of the building. (The Troop takes a break during some holidays and spring break.) 

Scouts are expected to arrive on time, in uniform and with their Scout Handbooks. Being on time teaches proper respect and etiquette and is important for a successful meeting. We are expected to conduct ourselves as guests of LUMC and to leave it in the same condition as it was when we arrived. Adults may attend the meetings, but are asked to respect the meeting decorum and keep quiet if within ear shod. (Often adults gather in an adjacent classroom.)

Troop meetings are planned and run by the Senior Patrol Leader (SPL), who is assisted by his Assistant Senior Patrol Leaders (ASPLs) and the Patrol Leaders Council (PLC). At troop meetings Scouts will:

  • Gather for the opening ceremony, hear announcements of upcoming events and meet as a troop or patrol to make plans for upcoming activities and campouts. Often there is also a special program or a guest speaker.
  • Work (either as a group or individually) on rank and merit badge advancement with older Scouts or merit badge counselors.
  • Gather for the closing ceremony and the Scoutmaster’s Minute.

It is our hope that our troop meetings are fun and productive. Some of this is dependent on the scout-led nature of the meetings as well as the Scouts’ level of participation and behavior.

Schedule Conflicts

From time to time schedule conflicts will arise. Our Troop holds schoolwork, religious education and family responsibilities as a higher priority than Scouting. We also understand Scouts balance sports, band and other extracurricular activities. Be assured that there is no penalty for an absence from any meeting. If a Scout is unable to attend a troop meeting or activity due to a conflict, it is preferred that the Scout call, email or text his patrol leader to let him know. This is a responsibility of the Scout and not his parent. (Note: Good attendance is important for a Scout’s fulfillment of leadership for rank advancement. Significant absences will not count towards fulfilling advancement leadership requirements.)

First Year Scout Program

Troop 282 has a robust program specifically designed for our “First Year” scouts called Trail to First Class. This program is designed so our young Scouts will have the opportunity over the course of 12-18 months to advance through the initial ranks focused on skill achievements.

Camping

Our Troop loves to camp. We camp once a month during the school year rain or shine. Some campouts are one night but often we camp two nights. The PLC chooses the campouts at the start of each semester, and planning is done at regular troop meeting. Campouts are posted on Troop Track (our website) and announced at the weekly meetings. Sign-ups are done on Troop Track. Most campouts are less an hour drive of Kansas City, which helps facilitates Scouts who need to come and go for sports or other obligations. (See Camping section for more information.)

Parent Involvement

We are always in need of adult involvement and we cannot function without it. There are roles in every phase of a successful Scouting program that need adult involvement -- from attending camping and outdoor activities, to participation on committees, to “one-timers” like helping with driving or a special event. We expect parents to become involved with the Troop in some fashion; and we have jobs big and small. We also find Scouts tend to stay more active in Scouting when their parents are involved. The best way to get involved is to listen for or ask for an opportunity to help. Training is available online at my.scouting.org in order to give parents (or even grandparents) the tools they need. All active adult must complete the BSA Youth Protection Training to keep our Scouts safe.

Troop Communications

Our Troop utilizes several methods of communication of troop programs and activities. As part of the registration process, parents receive access to the secure portion of the Troop’s website on Troop Track which maintains a calendar of events and is full of other important information. The Troop also uses Troop Track to send emails about troop programs and activities. It is requested (but not required) that Scouts have their own email so they can also utilize Troop Track and receive troop emails. Finally, our PLC utilizes the GroupMe App to send group texts to each other to assist with their program planning. (Monitored by adult leaders.)

Uniforms

Scouts wear their Class A uniform for all weekly troop meetings, traveling to/from campouts, courts of honor, boards of review and other formal Scouting activities. For the Class A uniform, Scouts purchase a “Class A” shirt and the Troop provides a neckerchief. (Official Scout socks and belt are recommended.) Class B uniforms - consisting of red Troop T-shirts (provided by the Troop) - are worn while camping, for service projects and at summer camp.

Boy Scout Handbook

The Boy Scout Handbook is is vital to Scout participation and advancement. All Scouts should obtain a handbook as soon as possible because the handbook tracks and guides them through their Rank requirements and logs their camping and service project hours. You can purchase either a spiral bound version or a basic glued spine version. We highly recommend you purchase a cover for your handbook, which will help the handbook withstand the heavy wear and tear Scouts put them through as well as give them a place to keep a pen.

Basic Costs

Troop Dues are paid once a year at the start of 1st semester. (Currently $35.)  BSA Dues are paid at the start of 2nd semester.  (Currently $33.)  Campout costs vary depending on the activity and location. Typical costs ranges from $15 to $30, but some special campouts may be slightly more. Scholarships are available for financial hardships, as we want everyone to be able to participate. If you have specific questions about troop costs or scholarships, please contact either the Treasurer or Committee Chair.

How to Join

Any boy who meets the membership requirements  specified in the Boy Scout Handbook can join Troop 282. In general, this means the boy is between the age of 11 and 17 and/or has completed the 5th grade. (See Boy Scout Handbook for complete requirements.) Troop registration requires completion of the standard BSA registration form and payment of all fees. The annual registration fee is paid to the BSA National Council. It is requested that at least one parent register with their Scout as an Adult Leader.  (See Parent Involvement.)


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